Dec 092016
 

Oops I Did It Again…

Live Upgrade, with my tried and trusted method. By now that method is so polished that I had no issue whatsoever, so I did all three computers at the same time. I’m just glad to have a decent internet connection… I think the total downloads added up to somewhere near 15 gigabyte.

Jan 092015
 

I finally updated my last machine from openSUSE 12.3 to 13.1 (in the usual way), and with that one I had a bit more fun than the other few times I’ve done this by now.

First mysql refused to start, then quite a few services that were enabled on 12.3 decided to be disabled on 13.1, but nothing during the update “told me so”… but now all seems to work fine.

Nov 232014
 

I’ve done it again… a live upgrade from openSUSE 13.1 to 13.2.

I’ve been following the usual process that I’ve outlined in a few posts so far, and it went pretty smoothly on three different computers.

The actual process has evolved into this:

  1. run this script (after editing to fix the version numbers):
    #!/bin/bash
    old=13.1
    new=13.2
    repodir=/etc/zypp/repos.d
    newrepodir=/etc/zypp/repos.d_${new}
    
    mkdir -p ${newrepodir}
    cd ${repodir}
    for repofile in *repo; do
    {
        echo -n converting ${repofile} to ${newrepodir}/$(echo ${repofile}|sed -e "s/${old}/${new}/g") ... ;
        cat "${repofile}" | sed -e "s/${old}/${new}/g" > "${newrepodir}/$(echo ${repofile}|sed -e "s/${old}/${new}/g")" ;
        echo done.
    }
    done;
  2. move /etc/zypp/repos.d out of the way, for example rename it to /etc/zypp/repos.d_old
  3. move /etc/zypp/repos.d_13.2 to /etc/zypp/repos.d
  4. clean zyppers cache:
    zypper cc --all
  5. refresh zypper:
    zypper ref

    When you do this, you might get errors for some repositories because they don’t exist yet for 13.2. To disable them, do this:

    zypper mr -d -R 

    On the other hand you might want to investigate if there are 13.2 versions of those repositories, and edit the repo files accordingly.
    Then, repeat the zypper ref command.

  6. Once you can run through zypper ref without errors, get updated versions of zypper, libzypp and rpm, and install them:
    zypper up --download only zypper libzypp rpm
    zypper up zypper libzypp rpm
  7. Once that finished without errors, do the same two commands for the whole distribution (Pay attention to any warnings and/or conflicts here. You’ll have to make the right choices about what should be done to resolve them, and I can’t really give you a recipe):
    zypper dup -l --download only
    zypper dup -l
  8. After all is done you can reboot. The first reboot should lead into textmode in case you have to re-install/upgrade your nvidia or AMD binary drivers. To boot into text mode, append this kernel parameter:
    systemd.unit=multi-user.target

Have a lot of fun!

Dec 282013
 

Seeing that there are only two more weeks until openSUSE 12.2 reaches end of life, I’m doing my usual upgrade with zypper.

If you are about to say “didn’t you do that already some months ago“, that was a virtual machine…now it’s my “production” system. Let’s hope all goes as well as it did on the VM.

So far all is looking good, but 4500 packages takes some time, so I can’t really say anything yet. I’m doing 12.2 -> 12.3 and KDE 4.11 -> KDE 4.12 at the same time, so it might get a bit hairy at some point.

The fun part comes next week… if this goes well I’ll do the same to my wife’s laptop, where a failure will be way more painful…

 

Update: finished, all seems to be working fine.

Apr 152013
 

Like I already said before, openSUSE 12.3 was released today, and I’ve done the usual live upgrade with zypper.

The upgrade itself worked without any problems, and the resulting installation was usable without issues right from the start.

I logged into KDE 4.10 and everything that I’ve tried works just fine. I admit, I can’t say anything about performance as my test machine is accessed via a NoMachine remote desktop session.

After that I upgraded the KDE 4.10.0 to 4.10.1 from the opensuse build service, and that also went well and posed no problems afterwards. Now I’m waiting for my own repository for 12.3 to rebuild against KDE:Release:410.

I’m pretty confident in saying that with 12.3 the process of a live update via zypper can be done without major fear, as long as one has ones repositories set up properly, and with the right priorities (packman and KDE from OBS should have a higher priority than the stop openSUSE repositories).

Mar 132013
 

Today, openSUSE 12.3 got released after 6 months of hard work by openSUSE members and contributors.

As usual, I’m doing a zypper live upgrade, but so far it’s still downloading packages, so I can’t say anything about 12.3 just yet.

I am going to post a review of the process and the results after it is finished. In the mean time, if you’re in the area (southern Germany), why not go to the release party in Nürnberg? It starts at 7pm at artefakt.

Jan 102013
 

I’ve done it, and upgraded my wife’s and my own laptop to openSUSE 12.2 with zypper, following the same procedure as mentioned before. My experiences so far:

  • My wife had trouble with pulseaudio / phonon playing correctly through HDMI to the built-in speakers on her monitor. I had to actually delete all user settings for phonon, pulseaudio, and gstreamer, but now it works without a hitch.
  • Initially some KDE apps didn’t want to remember that they are supposed to start minimized. Same as before, deleting the settings files solved it.
  • Certain older software that comes only as binary does not work anymore. No actual surprise there.
  • Certain older games from some of the humble bundles that comes as binary RPM got uninstalled because openSUSE 12.2 does not have the required libraries anymore. No surprise there either, and no personal loss as I played those only on my phone.
  • Certain older software does not build anymore because it comes with old, outdated versions of some required libraries, and those don’t build with gcc 4.7.1.
  • After a resume, the network interfaces are still down. Not good when you’re operating on a NIS/NFS setup. Workaround: disable automatic suspend to disk.

Enough of the bad, here are some few of the positive things that stand out:

  • With the 3.4 kernel we can have Solaar which basically monitors the battery charge in logitech wireless equipment.
  • Steam runs on it. Yep, steam as in http://store.steampowered.com/. Maybe linux gaming will finally get somewhere where Loki games should have taken it 10 years ago.
  • The whole setup feels snappier than 12.1.

All in all, this upgrade is one of the better ones. I like it so far.

Dec 122012
 

I’m doing it again. Upgrading a live system with zypper, this time the step is 12.1->12.2.

The procedure has been described here and here; let’s see what happens.

Update:

Everything worked fine, with the small exception that the ssh daemon config needed one small tweak to get nxserver to work again.
Hint: nxserver uses authorized_keys2, suse uses authorized_keys as the ssh key file name.

Mar 172011
 

Here’s a little followup to my previous post about how to upgrade to 11.4.

This one describes how to make the whole process even more risky. You have been warned.
It’s even possible to do this remotely through a ssh session. If you attempt to do that, do it from inside a screen session!

Actually, this first bit makes it a bit easier:

#!/bin/bash

repodir=/etc/zypp/repos.d
newrepodir=/etc/zypp/repos.d_11.4
old=11.3
new=11.4

mkdir -p ${newrepodir}

cd ${repodir}

for repofile in *repo; do
{
 echo -n converting ${repofile} to ${newrepodir}/$(echo ${repofile}|sed -e 's/11.3/11.4/g') ... ;
 cat "${repofile}" | sed -e 's/11.3/11.4/g' > "${newrepodir}/$(echo ${repofile}|sed -e 's/11.3/11.4/g')" ;
 echo done.
}

done;

This script creates a directory /etc/zypp/repos.d_11.4 with all your configured repos switched to their 11.4 counterparts.

After you run this script, all you have to do is move the old /etc/zypp/repos.d out of the way, rename the new one to /etc/zypp/repos.d and make sure that all the paths in the repo files exist. If they don’t, “zypp ref” is going to complain.

now, before you begin, run these two commands:

zypper cc --all
zypper ref

The first one clears all zypper cache folders, the second one refreshes all repositories (here’s where you’ll see if all paths are correct).
If you have a custom X11 setup (dualscreen or such), now would be the point to make a copy of your xorg.conf file.
Now you jump into the instructions in my previous post, right at #6.

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